Aggregate Nutrient Density Index ANDI Score

ANDI ScoresThe Aggregate Nutrient Density Index (ANDI) score

It was developed by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. It measures calcium; the carotenoids beta carotene, alpha carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene; fiber; folate; glucosinolates; iron; magnesium; niacin; selenium; vitamins B1 (thiamine),  B2 (riboflavin), B6, B12, C, and E; and zinc, plus the ORAC score X 2. Most importantly, the ANDI scores are based on calories, not volume or weight of food, so a lower-calorie food with more nutrients scores higher than a calorie-dense food, which is why iceberg lettuce scores high. 

According to the Wikipedia description:

Aggregate Nutrient Density Index (ANDI) is a score assigned to whole foods that contain the highest nutrients per calorie as Dr. Joel Fuhrman describes in his books Eat For Health and Eat Right America Nutritarian Handbook. Each of these whole foods is given a score based on the equation H=N/C, which is that the health of a food is equal to the nutrients it delivers per calorie. Each ANDI score is based on a possible score of 1,000-0, with 1,000 being the most nutrient dense and 0 being the least nutrient dense. Kale, Mustard Greens, Collard Greens, and Watercress all receive a score of 1,000 using the H=N/C equation, while foods like meat, seafood, and dairy products receive scores below 50 and are not considered by Dr. Fuhrman to be health-supporting. Fuhrman argues in his book that a nutrient-dense diet can prevent or even reverse diseases and also sustainably reverse obesity.

The system has been adopted by Whole Foods Market grocery stores.[1][2]

In 2012 revised ANDI Food Scores were published by Dr. Fuhrman in his new book Nutritarian Handbook & ANDI Food Scoring Guide. The updated score system has not dramatically changed the food scores, however it takes into account the newest scientific information about several newly researched and documented beneficial phytochemicals such as inhibitors of angiogenesis, isothiocyanates, organosulfides and aromatase inhibitors.[3]

According to Dr. Fuhrman.

ANDI Food Scores

The Standard American Diet (SAD) is made up mostly of disease-causing foods, with 25% of calories from animal products and over 60% from processed foods; lifestyle-related diseases are the most common causes of death, but according to a 2011 poll by Consumer Reports Health, 90% Americans believe that they eat a healthy diet. In addition, 43% of Americans polled reported that they drank at least one sugar-sweetened drink each day, 40% said that they eat ‘pretty much everything’ that they want, and 33% of overweight and obese individuals reported that they were at a healthy weight.1

This highlights the nutritional misinformation that abounds in our society. Most Americans do not understand that whole plant foods are the best for our health – they are led to believe that processed foods labeled “low-fat” or “low-carb,” artificially sweetened beverages, pasta, grilled chicken, and olive oil make up a healthful diet. Americans have not yet grasped the concept of nutrient density.

H = N/C (Health = Nutrients / Calories)
Adequate consumption of micronutrients – vitamins, minerals, and many other phytochemicals – without overeating on calories, is the key to achieving excellent health. Micronutrients fuel proper functioning of the immune system and enable the detoxification and cellular repair mechanisms that protect us from chronic diseases. A nutritarian is someone whose food choices reflect a high ratio of micronutrients per calorie and a high level of micronutrient variety.

Dr. Fuhrman has completely revised his ANDI (Aggregate Nutrient Density Index) scoring system to provide a more accurate picture of each food’s nutritional quality. Dr. Fuhrman originally developed the ANDI scoring system to rank foods according to micronutrients per calorie, including vitamins, minerals, and as many known beneficial phytochemicals as possible. Since the original calculation of the ANDI scores new information has come to light regarding certain beneficial phytochemicals, such as angiogenesis inhibitorsorganosulfidesisothiocyanates, and aromatase inhibitors. Dr. Fuhrman has incorporated this information into a revised algorithm that more accurately reflects the nutritional value of each food.

To effectively and concisely illustrate the concept of nutrient density and rank common foods by nutrient density, Dr. Fuhrman has developed a new reference book for the nutritarian lifestyle, which includes the new and improved ANDI food scoring system.

Here is a list of the top 30 super foods according the ANDI scoring system. No surprise here that the green leafy vegetables are at the top of the list.

Here are some ANDI scores:

  • Mustard/Turnip/Collard Greens; Cooked Kale; Watercress 1000+
  • Kale, raw 905
  • Bok Choy 825
  • Spinach, raw 739
  • Rapini 715
  • Napa Cabbage, cooked 704
  • Spinach, cooked 697
  • Brussels Sprouts 672
  • Chard, cooked 670
  • Napa Cabbage, raw 600
  • Chicory Greens, raw 591
  • Chlorella 561
  • Arugula 559
  • Radishes 554
  • Cocoa (dry powder, unsweetened) 518
  • Basil, fresh 475
  • Parsley, fresh 474
  • Spearmint, fresh 457
  • Bean Sprouts 444
  • Cilantro, fresh 431
  • Oregano, fresh 426
  • Thyme, fresh 422
  • Cabbage, raw; Red Peppers 420
  • Leaf Lettuce 406
  • Kohlrabi 393
  • Romaine 389
  • Broccoli, raw 376
  • Cabbage, cooked 374
  • Pumpkin, canned 372
  • Yellow or Orange Pepper 371
  • V-8 Vegetable Juice, low sodium 365
  • Radicchio 359
  • Horseradish Root; Red Cabbage, raw 352
  • Carrot Juice 344
  • Broccoli, cooked; Broccolini; Tomato Juice, low sodium 342
  • Boston, Butterhead, or Bibb Lettuce 339
  • Turnips 337
  • Carrots, cooked 336
  • Red Cabbage, cooked 330
  • Dandelion Greens, cooked 329
  • Dill, fresh 326
  • Green Chile Peppers, 323
  • Curly Endive; Escarole 322
  • Acai Berries 319
  • Wheatgrass Juice 312
  • Sorrel, boiled 310
  • Mixed Baby Greens 300
  • Cauliflower, cooked 295
  • Peppermint, fresh 293
  • Cauliflower, raw 285
  • Lemon, raw 280
  • Bay Leaves 271
  • Chives, fresh 269
  • Salsa 267
  • Green Peppers 258
  • Tomato Sauce, canned, low sodium 248
  • Artichoke 244
  • Carrots, raw 240
  • All Bran; Cranberries, fresh 236
  • Asparagus, cooked 234
  • Guava 223
  • Zucchini 222
  • Belgian Endive 215
  • Dulse, Strawberries 212
  • Nori 209
  • Ginger 200
  • Tomato Paste, no salt 197
  • Pomegranate Juice 193
  • Tomato, cooked 190
  • Blackberries 178
  • Strawberries, frozen 174
  • Scallions 173
  • Pumpkin 170
  • Serrano Peppers 167
  • Pomegranate 166
  • Jalepeño Peppers; Tomatoes, raw 164
  • Tomatoes, canned, no salt 163
  • Butternut Squash 159
  • Plums 157
  • Eggplant, cooked 149
  • Raspberries 145
  • Bamboo Shoots, canned 144
  • Lemon Juice; Summer Squash 141
  • Okra, cooked 139
  • Squash: Sweet Dumpling, Red Kuri, Kabocha, Delicata, Carnival, Buttercup 137
  • Blueberries; Celery; Mushrooms, raw 135
  • Alfalfa Sprouts 130
  • Snow Peas or Sugar Snap Peas, raw 127
  • Cardoons 120
  • Papaya 118
  • Brazil Nuts 116
  • Wakame 115
  • Goji Berries; Radish Sprouts 114
  • Snow Peas or Sugar Snap Peas, cooked; Sun Dried Tomatoes 113
  • Iceberg Lettuce 110
  • Blackberries, frozen 111
  • Orange 109
  • Blue Hubbard Squash 108
  • Rhubarb, cooked 107
  • Lentils 104
  • Grapefruit 102
  • Cantaloupe; Fava Beans; Lime; Red Kidney Beans; Starfruit 100
  • Blueberries, frozen; Lime Juice 99
  • Beets, cooked; Kiwi 97
  • Great Northern Beans; Cannellini 94
  • Ketchup, low sodium 92
  • Watermelon 91
  • Orange Juice 86
  • Adzuki Beans; Heirloom Beans; Rosemary 84
  • Black Beans; Sweet Potato 83
  • Black-Eyed Peas 82
  • Leeks, cooked 80
  • Sunflower Seeds 78
  • Apples; Green Beans, canned; Kumquats; Peaches 76
  • Jicama; Rutabaga Root 75
  • Green Beans, cooked; Yellow Crookneck Squash 74
  • Tangerine; Tomatillo 72
  • Green Peas, Hummus 70
  • Cherries; Chia 68
  • Chayote Squash 67
  • Celery Root; Salba 66
  • Sesame Seeds; Flax Seeds 65
  • Apricots; Pineapples 64
  • Figs, fresh 62
  • Pinto Beans 61
  • Fennel Bulb 60
  • Edamame; Garlic; Passion Fruit; Split Peas 58
  • Chickpeas (Garbanzos) 57
  • Cranberry Juice Cocktail; Lemongrass;  Lotus Root; Quince 55
  • Pasilla Pepper, dried; Tahini 54
  • Oats, old-fashioned 53
  • Pumpkin Seeds 52
  • Mango 51
  • Cucumbers; Onions, cooked 50
  • Green Peas, canned; Spaghetti Squash 49
  • Pistachios; Soybeans 48
  • Prunes; Mustard 47
  • Acorn Squash; Lima Beans; Pears 46
  • Honeydew; Soy Burgers 45
  • Corn; Persimmon; Shallots 44
  • Barley, whole grain; Potatoes, baked, flesh and skin; Wild Rice 43
  • Cherimoya 42
  • Pecans; Brown Rice; Nectarine 41
  • Sprouted Grain Bread 39
  • Almonds; Coconut Water 38
  • Avocado; Parsnips; Peanuts; Tofu 37
  • Apples, dried; Hearts of Palm; Sunchoke Root 36
  • Cranberries, dried and sweetened; Dark Chocolate; Walnuts 34
  • Soy Milk 33
  • Filberts; Hazelnuts; Pearled Barley 32
  • Potato, flesh only; Grapes 31
  • Bananas; Soy Nuts 30
  • Apricots, dried; Burdock Root; Peaches, canned in own juice; Sugar Cane 29
  • Yellow corn, canned 28
  • Cashews; Hemp Milk; Kamut; Soy Cheese 27
  • Peanut Butter; Pine Nuts; Tempeh 26
  • Figs, dried; Wheat Berries; Whole Wheat Bread; Whole Wheat Bagel;  25
  • Olives, Taro Root 24
  • Tofu Hot Dog; Yams, cooked 23
  • Cornmeal, whole grain; Granola 22
  • Buckwheat; Currants, dried; Peaches, canned in light syrup; Quinoa; Whole heat Tortilla 21
  • Rye Bread 20
  • Almond Milk; Dates; Millet; Quick Oats, Whole Wheat Pasta, Whole Wheat Pita; Pumpernickel Bread; Water Chestnuts 19
  • Bagel; White Bread; White Pasta; Tamarind; Yucca (Cassava) 18
  • Balsamic Vinegar; Bulgur; Chestnuts; Macadamia Nuts; Soy Yogurt 17
  • Apple Juice; Peaches, canned in heavy syrup; Popcorn, air-popped; Raisin Bread; Raisins 16
  • White Flour Tortilla; Couscous 15
  • Cashew Butter; English Muffin; Pretzels 13
  • Fruit Roll-ups; Rice Cakes; Corn Tortilla; White Rice 12
  • Granola Bar; Potato Chips; Saltines 11
  • Coconut, fresh; Corn Pasta; Pine Nuts; Rice Milk 10
  • Frozen Fruit and Juice Bar; Olive Oil; Oreos 9
  • Fig Bars; Graham Crackers; Popcorn, oil popped, no salt; Toaster Pastry 8
  • Beer; Coconut, dried, unsweetened; French Fries 7
  • Corn Chips 6
  • Chocolate Cake; Pound Cake 5
  • Maple Syrup 4
  • Margarine; Oil and Vinegar 3
  • Apple Butter; Corn Oil; Fruit Preserves; Margarine; Wine 3
  • Brown Sugar 2
  • Cola; Corn Syrup; Jelly 1

For a Different View, To Understand Nutrient Patterns - See The 3 Classes Of Foods

About John Allen Mollenhauer

John Allen Mollenhauer (JAM) is a lifestyle entrepreneur, the founder of Nutrient Rich®, and a Nutrition Education Trainer (NET). His mission is to create natural, organic products for people who don't want to compromise their nutrition when they can't sit down for a local, plant- based, nutrient-rich meal, and help people understand why eating micronutrient rich foods are the key to healthy eating.

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